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28% of media consumption will be by mobile internet in 2020

24% of all media consumption across the world will be by mobile internet this year, with figures suggesting that by 2020 this number will increase to 28%, according to new data published in Zenith’s Media Consumption Forecasts 2018.

The figures show a dramatic increase in media consumption by mobile across the world, which was just 5% back in 2011, with mobile eroding the consumption of nearly all other media, including newspapers and magazines.

The report reveals that time spent reading traditional print media such as newspapers has fallen by over 45%, and 56% for magazines. However, those that have adapted to online have gained from what was lost in print readership.

The rise of mobile has directly influenced the way that brands now plan communications, focussing less on channels and more on consumer mind-set and behaviour.

TV and radio are also losing the battle against the rise of mobile, although not as dramatically as traditional print media, with the average time spent watching TV shrinking by 3% between 2011 and 2018, along with time spent listening to radio down by 8%.

Brands can now take advantage of the various boundaries that mobile offers through different channels, entertainment, news, information, research, communication and socialising building awareness with the ability of creating direct responses and one-to one communication.

Zenith says the rapid expansion of mobile internet use has increased the amount of time the average individual spends consuming media, by giving people access to essentially unlimited content almost everywhere, and at any time of the day. We estimate that the average person will spend 479 minutes a day consuming media this year, 12% more than in 2011. Zenith forecasts the total to reach 492 minutes a day in 2020.

“Under traditional definitions, all other media are losing out to the mobile internet,” said Jonathan Barnard, Zenith’s head of forecasting and director of global Intelligence. “But the truth is that the distinctions between media are becoming less important, and mobile technology offers publishers and brands more opportunities to reach consumers than ever.”

“Mobile technology is challenging brands to rethink how they communicate with consumers,” said Vittorio Bonori, Zenith’s global brand president. “Brands need to understand both the consumer’s mind-set and where they sit on the consumer journey, to determine how to communicate with them. By using data, ad tech and now artificial intelligence, brands can co-ordinate their communications across media and mind-sets to move them along the consumer journey most effectively.”

UK marketers ‘burying their heads in the sand’ on automation

A new survey has revealed that low-level, repetitive tasks are stifling the flow of creative juices and operational efficiencies among UK marketers.

And yet a third are choosing not to do anything about it.

The Digital Work Report 2018, commissioned by Wrike, found 33 per cent of UK marketers say that automation is not something they are considering, while 34 per cent saying they do not believe it would give their company a competitive edge.

However, nearly all (98 per cent) who took part admitted some aspect of their work is repetitive or cognitively routine, with a quarter estimating as much as 61-80 per cent.

Crucially, the survey found over two-thirds (69 per cent) believe they could achieve more work if technology could take on repetitive tasks such as filing, copying information between systems and documenting action items from meetings – with a quarter saying as much as 50 per cent more if that was the case.

If they could win back some valuable time, marketers would choose to focus more on creative work (32 per cent), team management (26 per cent), developing strategic projects (21 per cent), time spent listening to customers (20 per cent) and creating a better work culture in the office (19 per cent).

The report found that the ability to be efficient is hampered by some of the processes in place in their organisations; 27 per cent felt work is done across too many systems, creating duplication of work and communications, for example.

While 48 per cent said they have a culture of operational excellence in place, whereby they constantly review and improve how they are doing things within their team and organisation, only 10 per cent scored their company’s ability to consistently deliver high-quality work on time with existing resources as ‘excellent’. 30 per cent of UK marketers say their company strives to improve processes but changes are just too slow.

“Traditionally marketers are at the cutting edge of technology trends when it comes to the work they deliver, but these results suggest they are not always finding time to practice what they preach,” said Andrew Filev, CEO and founder of Wrike.

“With ever-increasing pressure around delivery times, personalisation of products and predictability, the marketing craft is being slowly buried under a mountain of disparate processes that leave little time for adding real creative value. With business automation developing at pace, change management is becoming an increasingly important part of the role.”

Interestingly, 34 per cent of marketers said they believe that when it comes to flawless execution they could do a better job than their boss. Worryingly, out of frustration with a lack of operational efficiency, 32 per cent of marketers have searched for a new job.

81% of UK marketers feel ready for GDPR, but their employers may not be

GDPR awareness is at its highest level since 2016 and 81% of marketers feel prepared – although 7% say their employers still have no plan in place.

The deadline for Europe’s most significant overhaul of consumer data privacy laws is this coming Friday (May 25th) and the Digital Marketing Association (DMA) has published research that finds UK marketers’ confidence in their GDPR preparations is at an all-time high.

The report, ‘GDPR & You – Chapter 5’, found that 81% of marketers are confident in their understanding and preparedness for GDPR, having steadily grown from 49% since the DMA’s first survey in 2016.

However, one in five (20%) of marketers state that their employers are behind schedule and will not be ready to comply with GDPR by 25 May. Worse still, 7% state that their organisation do not have a plan in place for GDPR.

Although not being enforced until 25 May, the transition period for organisations to become GDPR compliant began two years ago, and the DMA says there is a growing belief that the benefits of the new regulations to consumers outweigh the disadvantages to businesses, with more than half (52%) of marketers believing this to be true.

“It is encouraging to see that GDPR awareness and preparedness is at an all-time high, with marketers increasingly optimistic about the benefits of the new legislation,” said Chris Combemale, CEO of the DMA. “GDPR is a fantastic opportunity for organisations to build consumer trust and highlight to their customers the benefits of sharing their data. Organisations should use it to build a culture within their business of putting the consumer first and improving their experience.”

68% of marketers believe their employer is either on track or ahead of schedule with GDPR compliance.

In response to the findings that one in four marketers’ (27%) believe their organisations are either behind schedule or without a plan, Combemale said: “While the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has stated that they will be pragmatic before handing out penalties, these companies must show evidence that they are doing everything in their power to be ready. Otherwise they won’t just be receiving fines from the ICO; they could lose their customers’ trust and be at risk of security breaches, with the reputational damage posing a real threat to brand and share value.”

Over a quarter of marketers have received no specific training in GDPR

One of the biggest priorities for marketers and their organisations surrounding GDPR and highlighted in the report revolves around staff training – with a spike in the past six months in the percentage of marketers who feel they have received appropriate training for GDPR, up 21% from November 2017 to 54% in the latest survey.

But the DMA says it’s a concern that despite the complexities of GDPR compliance and its impact on how organisations communicate with customers, more than a quarter of marketers polled (27%) have had no specific training to date. 34% felt that more training was needed and approximately 68% believed training will help their organisation comply beyond the deadline.

Find full details on the report on the DMA website, here: https://dma.org.uk/article/gdpr-and-you-chapter-five 

Two thirds of UK firms won’t be GDPR compliant by May 25

New research says UK companies are massively ill-prepared for this week’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) enforcement deadline.

Less than a third (29%) of organisations surveyed by USB drive specialist Apricorn felt confident they would comply, and when questioned further and asked whether there were any areas they might be likely to fail, 81% could think of some area of the new requirements that might cause them to fail when it comes to GDPR compliance.

Fifty per cent of organisations who know that GDPR will apply to them admit that a lack of understanding of the data they collect and process is their number one concern relating to non-compliance.

On top of this, almost four in ten (37%) believe they are most likely to fail because of gaps in employee training, and almost a quarter (23%) say their employees don’t understand the new responsibilities that come with the GDPR.

While one in ten still regard the GDPR as a mere tick box exercise, a substantial proportion do view it as being of some benefit to their organisation – for example 44% agree that the new regulation is a welcome opportunity to overhaul their organisation’s data handling and security processes.

The most commonly taken step so far, for those who say they will be at least somewhat prepared for the GDPR, is to review and update their security policies for mobile working (67%). However, 30% still worry they could fail to comply due to mobile working, and almost a quarter (22%) of respondents are concerned they may fail due to a lack of encryption.

“Data or personally identifiable information (PII) is at the heart of GDPR and mapping and securing it should be every organisation’s number one priority. By now, all employees, from the top down, should have an understanding of the importance of GDPR and the role they play in keeping this data safe,” said Jon Fielding, Managing Director, EMEA Apricorn. “While we know that many organisations have provided some form of employee training, clearly in some cases this hasn’t been effective and organisations should address these gaps urgently.”

GUEST BLOG: Best books for digital marketing execs to get ahead

By Where The Trade Buys

Ready to take your business to the next level? Want to excel in digital marketing? Knowledge is power in business, and in the rapidly evolving sector of technology, staying ahead is critical.

The last thing you want to do is fall behind in business — so learning all there is to know is crucial for success. From how to create the optimum working environment for creative minds, to the world’s next consumer-changing digital trends, there’s a lot you don’t know yet about entrepreneurship and the tech industry…

Bold: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World

Bold, written by Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler,is the ideal book for the tech-savvy entrepreneur. The first section of this illuminating book gives you an incredible insight into how start-up companies are today going from ‘initial concept’ to ‘multi-million-pounds status’ quicker than ever, and how tech — like 3D printing and androids — might be influencing this trend.

After, you can learn about business strategies from leading entrepreneurs, such as Richard Branson, before you reach the section that might interest you the most. Bold’s finale discusses the various, actionable ways you can build your company, with tips on creating lucrative campaigns designed to rocket your start-up to the top. A must-read for the big dreamer.

The Industries of the Future

This book by Alec Ross is perfect if you’re in the tech industry and want to know how to incorporate online strategies. A New York Timesbestseller, Ross delivers an extensive insight into your industry’s most important advances, from cybersecurity and robotics to genomics and big data, using input from global leaders.

If you’re searching for Ross’ credentials, you’ll soon discover that he was once the senior advisor for innovation to Hilary Clinton. So, his viewpoint is perceptive, learned and unique. His extensive travel has given him access to the some of the most powerful people in business, and his book is packed with astute observations regarding opportunities for growth and the unknown tech forces that are changing — or will change — the world.

The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future

As a former executive editor of Wired magazine, author, Kevin Kelly discusses and debates how various tech trends will adapt and amend our lives over the next 30 years or so. The best part of The Inevitableis how it paints a picture of ways in which technological forces will overlap, mix and come to co-depend on each other — crucial to know if any of these trends relate to your business.

Featuring sections on VR and AI, the author does an excellent job exploring the long-term impact of tech and it can permeate every aspect of our lives — both personally and as a consumer. Want to prep your company now for the customer of tomorrow? Then, get ahead of the game.

How Google Works

As potentially the most respected tech and digital company on the planet, this book about Google is an absolute must-read for those in the digital industry. How Google Workswas written by Google executives, Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg, and offers an authentic view in the corporate strategy, workplace culture, decision-making, and management philosophy of the brand.

If you want to learn how Google picked itself up after mistakes (remember Wave?) and has maintained an uncatchable drive towards innovation, this book is for you. Glimpse into the birth and evolution of Google to emulate its success.

The Lean Start-Up

If you’re in the digital sector, The Lean Start-Upby Eric Ries is a book you need to take in from cover to cover. This book looks at how new companies can launch, adapt and grow within an industry that has fierce competition. Offering real examples of setting up a new business, you get a great insight into how to make a success of your business and avoid the typical pitfalls.

Your One Word

Author, Evan Carmichael has written an outstanding account of his business process. Carmichael created and sold his biotech company at just 19 years old, so if you want tips on how to emulate his success, make this title the next on your reading list.

Learn how to analyse your business and validate its aims to make sure you enjoy limitless success with Your One Word. If you need a boost of confidence and an injection of motivation to start making your tech-business dreams come true, immerse yourself in the powerful words of Carmichael.

The Upstarts

The Upstartsby Brad Stone offers an amazing glimpse into the inspiring world of two global companies: Uber and Airbnb. Reading this book, you find out how these giants began and developed to become two of the most respected and innovative brands in the world.

Being an entrepreneur, you’ll know the importance of understanding how new trends and innovations can change standards — such as how people travel and what they expect from accommodation — and this is what you learn more about in this book. What can your business do to change the world?

Conscious Capitalism

Capitalism and its benefits is a contentious subject, and this is discussed brilliantly in Conscious Capitalismby authors, Raj Sisodia, and CEO of Whole Foods, John Mackey.

If you’re new to running a digital marketing or tech company, you should have good knowledge of how to deal with staff, shareholders and anyone else who deals with your company. Referencing several other leading companies — such as UPS, Google and Amazon — Conscious Capitalismgives an insightful and expert analysis of how you can infuse your business environment with positivity for the optimum workplace culture.

Having awareness of your company’s impact on the world and how to treat people who interact with your products and services are crucial to success — which is why this book is worth a read!

This article was created by Where The Trade Buys — a leading UK print company and supplier of roll-up banners.

Sources:

https://www.simplybusiness.co.uk/knowledge/articles/2017/08/best-books-to-read-for-small-business-success/

http://www.growthbusiness.co.uk/30-must-read-books-on-business-technology-and-productivity-as-picked-by-entrepreneurs-2552123/

http://uk.businessinsider.com/must-read-tech-books-2017-9?r=US&IR=T/#lean-in-women-work-and-the-will-to-lead-by-sheryl-sandberg-6

https://www.forbes.com/sites/mnewlands/2017/02/24/13-must-read-entrepreneurial-books-for-tech-founders/#1b08967a56b9

https://www.rocketspace.com/tech-startups/top-6-books-for-tech-entrepreneurs

IPA Bellwether reports UK digital ad budgets rise

The Institute of Practitioners in Advertising’s (IPA) Bellwether reports marketeers have revised their budgets upwards in the first quarter of 2017, the highest level recorded in almost a decade.

Some 26.1 per cent of those companies polled remain positive about 2017/18 budgets, signalling growth for the coming year,  while 11.8 per cent of companies said that marketing budgets would increase during the first quarter of 2017.

32 per cent of those companies polled also reported improvement in the financial pipeline, compared to 19 per cent that predicted things would be worse during the quarter.

The IPA reported marketers on tighter budgets are seeing greater value from digital and positioning ad spend accordingly, mostly as a direct result of the unknown effects of Brexit negotiations and wider economic uncertainty.

However, despite a positive outlook for digital ad spends in 2017, the IPA predicts stagnation materialising in 2018, with marketers being advised by experts to proceed with caution.

Speaking about the report, the IPA’s director general Paul Bainsfair said: “The election result has thrown further uncertainty into an already volatile environment.

“It is inevitable that this has had a knock-on effect on UK. Specifically, for marketers this has meant a desire, where possible, to seek out more activation driven advertising. As evidenced strongly in this latest Bellwether Report, this has resulted in a further move towards advertising in the digital space.”