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DMA and OneTrust offer marketers GDPR compliance tools

OneTrust and the Data & Marketing Association (DMA) have entered a strategic partnership to equip marketers with the tools, training and resources needed to successfully build, implement and scale responsible marketing programmes that comply with global privacy laws including the GDPR and CCPA.

As the DMA’s Responsible Marketing Partner, OneTrust will work with the organisation to provide software tools, training, resources and thought leadership to help marketing departments to responsibly manage, protect and administer customer data.

The GDPR and CCPA created new compliance challenges for marketers to maintain compliance while delivering customised user experiences. The partnership includes supporting the “Data Privacy: An industry perspective 2019” research. This latest survey is currently open to anyone working in the data & marketing industry to share their latest views.

The partnership includes:

  • Resources & Research: OneTrust and the DMA will produce joint surveys and webinars focused on the topics most relevant to marketers, including how to comply with the GDPR and the latest regulatory amendment to the CCPA.
  • Free In-Person Workshops: OneTrust and the DMA will partner at select PrivacyConnect and MarketingConnect workshops, free, local events that equip privacy and marketing professionals to connect, share experiences, and learn the latest regulatory requirements and implementation best practices.
  • The DMA’s Data Summit: OneTrust will also headline the DMA’s Data Protection Summit, taking place on 28 February in London.

“As the industry association representing the data and marketing industry, acting responsibly while also creating engaging experiences that put customers first is a core tenet of our Code. In OneTrust we have found a partner that shares these key values and the belief in a customer-centric approach to data and privacy,” said Rachel Aldighieri, MD of the Data & Marketing Association (DMA). “The partnership will also offer added benefit to our members, offering them access to a range of additional tools, training and resources to not just comply with privacy laws, but truly put the customer at the heart of their business. Giving them a competitive advantage by developing trust through their approach to data and privacy.”

“Becoming the DMA’s Responsible Marketing Partner was a natural fit; we share a mission to equip marketers for success while maintaining compliance with the evolving regulatory environment,” said Kabir Barday, CEO and Fellow of Information Privacy (FIP), OneTrust. “We’re excited to build upon our existing partnership and launch new research and resources for marketers. Together we’re able to provide members access to the OneTrust PreferenceChoice suite of marketing compliance tools, resources, research and best practices to responsibly manage and protect customer data.”

Consumers warm to brand data handling post-GDPR

Two in five consumers (41%) say they are more comfortable and confident that brands are handling their data correctly due to the introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

In addition, fewer people find themselves often questioning how a brand got their data in the first place than a year ago, according to the DMA’s ‘Consumer email tracker 2019’ report.

The research delves into consumers’ perceptions and preferences – when it comes to the channel most (59%) prefer brands to get in touch through email. In 2018, consumers believe they received less email than ever before, estimating this at around 57 per week to their personal inboxes – down from 73 in 2017 – and less than half of these (44%) are from brands.

In addition, consumers estimate they’re signed up to receive email messages from around nine different brands, which has also declined from 12 in 2017. The DMA says the figures are a potential by-product of the new laws and consumers’ belief they have more control over the marketing emails they receive.

Rachel Aldighieri, MD at the DMA, said: “Despite the challenges that the GDPR may have brought to marketers and their organisations, it has clearly had a positive impact on consumers. The fact that so many of the people we surveyed said the new rules have made them more confident about how brands treat their personal data should be seen as a very positive step. This year’s report highlights the power of email to be at the heart of brands’ communication with customers, being the central channel that others can then be built around. However, it’s fundamental that marketers combine convenience and relevance, building relationships based on transparency and trust.”

Phil Draper, Chief Marketing Officer at dotdigital, which helped pull together the data, said: “Creating powerful, two-way relationships with consumers should be at the core of all modern marketing strategies. It’s what consumers want, and what marketers are working to deliver. The fact that brands have reduced the number of emails they’re sending is an indication that brands are focusing more on delivering relevant and interesting content.”

Unsubscribe doesn’t have to mean unsubscribing

The most predominant reason for unsubscribing from a brand’s email programme is receiving too many messages (59%), followed by the information no longer being relevant (43%) and not recognising the brand (43%). Most people (70%) take action via the brand’s website or the button within an email, with 40% expecting to never hear from that brand (via email) again or only receive transactional emails (23%).

However, almost one in five expect to be taken to options where they can change their email preferences (9%) or to some form of survey (7%), offering marketers the opportunity to retain that customer by changing their approach or, at the very least, better understand why they’re leaving.

When offered this opportunity for control, around a third (36%) say they would like to reduce the frequency of emails they receive or specify the products/services they hear about (31%) – two of the key reasons they may have clicked unsubscribe in the first place.

Marcus Gearey, Chair of the DMA Email council’s research hub and Analytics manager, Zeta Global, added: “The management of the inbox is an attempt to maximise utility and minimise disruption. The right message of the right value still wins: too many of the wrong one makes it difficult to get that consumer to change their mind that your brand belongs in their spam folder rather than their inbox.”

Marketers to adopt traffic light labelling for data transparency

Leading marketing and media trade groups have unveiled the beta version of a new industry standard Data Transparency Label.

The new label was developed by the ANA’s Data Marketing & Analytics (DMA) division, the IAB Tech Lab, the Coalition for Innovative Media Measurement (CIMM) and the Advertising Research Foundation (ARF).

The Data Transparency Label was introduced during a presentation at Advertising Week 2018 with support from ANA, The ANA Council for Data Integrity, IAB Tech Lab’s Data Transparency Standards Working Group, IAB’s Data Center of Excellence, CIMM and ARF.

The label is the culmination of more than a year’s work in developing a “nutritional label” equivalent for audience segment data sets that discloses source, collection, segmentation criteria, recency and cleansing specifics. The group is also establishing a centralised database to house the label information, as well as an associated compliance program that will govern disclosure, certification and validation.

The trade associations and their members were motivated to develop this standard Data Transparency Label to help reputable marketers, fundraisers and agencies better leverage data in a responsible manner, to enable the delivery of increasingly-relevant messages to consumers and donors and to improve the overall consumer experience with content and advertising.

The thinking is simple – data buyers are making billions of dollars in media spend decisions based on audience segmentation data, but few tools enable marketers to learn “what’s inside” the data they buy.

The Data Transparency Label, which was developed to serve as an industry standard, is comprised of four descriptive sections designed to better inform buyers of each data set’s ingredients:

  1. Data Solution Provider and Distributor Information
    Who provided the data segment, inclusive of contact information, for both data solution distributor and, where applicable, original data provider;
  2. Audience Snapshot
    What audience segment the label describes, including both the provider’s branded audience segment name as well as the most relevant segment name from a new standardized taxonomy, a top-line audience description and applicable geographic coverage;
  3. Audience Construction
    How the segment was constructed, inclusive of details such as audience count, any applicable modeling or cross-device ID expansion that may have been applied, audience refresh rates, and event lookback window for inclusion;
  4. Source Information
    Where the original data components were sourced. Required for each significant data source, this component includes details on data provenance, data collection techniques, refresh frequency, and event lookback window.

With the announcement, data, technology, media and marketing companies are now being invited to participate in a six-month public comment period, during which time participants can test-drive the label with up to fifty common syndicated audience segments provided by globally-recognised data solution providers such as Oracle Data Cloud, LiveRamp, Neustar, Lotame, Acxiom, Experian, TruSignal, Fluent and FullContact.

During the six-month public comment period, interested parties can explore how a Data Transparency Label can be used and accessed at DataLabel.org, an online tool that demonstrates how viewers could search, inspect, and compare sample labels housed either within a participating DMP/DSP platform, or directly on DataLabel.org as a distinct access point.

Along with ANA, IAB, IAB Tech Lab, CIMM, and ARF, this initiative is being driven by 15 association member companies, including a Leadership Committee that includes LiveRamp, MediaMath, Neustar and Oracle Data Cloud, and a working group that includes 1-800-FLOWERS, Acxiom, Disabled American Veterans (DAV), Experian, FCB/SIX, FullContact, Fluent, Moxie, Publisher’s Clearing House, TruSignal, MetLife and the United States Postal Service.

“Client-side marketers and fundraisers have been demanding better standards around data quality and integrity. We felt it was important to corral several industry wide initiatives into one industry standard to enhance efficiency and to improve the toolset that client-side marketers and fundraisers use to make important decisions about data segments. In collaboration with CIMM, ARF, IAB and IAB Tech Lab we are delighted to bring this important tool in data transparency to market,” said Tom Benton, ANA Group EVP, DMA Division. “The industry now has a well-considered, easy to use and easy to understand label that clearly defines critical data source information. We hope that the transparency this label brings will be a driving force that improves data integrity, data quality, and the decisions that marketers and fundraisers make every day.”

“The Data Transparency Label enables meaningful understanding of segment attributes and sourcing practices across data providers,” said Dennis Buchheim, Senior Vice President and General Manager, IAB Tech Lab. “The collaboration with ANA, CIMM, ARF, and IAB – alongside complementary Tech Lab efforts to facilitate privacy-compliant data access and activation through a common ID namespace – enables more effective and responsible use of data in marketing and helps improve consumer ad experiences. As a whole, these initiatives provide a foundation to support digital marketing’s ongoing role in funding content and services.”

INFOGRAPHIC: DMA reveals global consumer privacy trends

The Digital Marketing Association (DMA) has detailed consumer attitudes to privacy across 10 nations, encompassing attitudes, opinions and preferences and how they change depending on their location.

The research, conducted in partnership with Acxiom and Foresight Factory, found that:

  • 51% of people are ‘data pragmatists’ who exchange their data as long as there is a clear benefit.
  • 21% are ‘data unconcerned’ who do not mind how and why their data is used.
  • 23% are ‘data fundamentalists who never share their data for any reason.
  • The data pragmatists are most likely to be found in the US, Spain and Singapore, while data fundamentalists are found en mass in in Australia, Germany and The Netherlands.
  • Nearly half of all consumers would use their data to negotiate better offers.
  • 83% of consumers would like more control over their data.

The DMA concludes: “Although each nation differs in some ways, globally consumers are remarkably similar – most aspects of privacy remain the same wherever you are. Globally, the majority of consumers are pragmatists – willing to share their data so long as there is a benefit. Trading data is a common desire among consumers and data as a commodity will become more important to companies in the years to come.”

The DMA has produced a handy infographic to break down its findings and will be running a webinar on July 11th to delve deeper into the results.

81% of UK marketers feel ready for GDPR, but their employers may not be

GDPR awareness is at its highest level since 2016 and 81% of marketers feel prepared – although 7% say their employers still have no plan in place.

The deadline for Europe’s most significant overhaul of consumer data privacy laws is this coming Friday (May 25th) and the Digital Marketing Association (DMA) has published research that finds UK marketers’ confidence in their GDPR preparations is at an all-time high.

The report, ‘GDPR & You – Chapter 5’, found that 81% of marketers are confident in their understanding and preparedness for GDPR, having steadily grown from 49% since the DMA’s first survey in 2016.

However, one in five (20%) of marketers state that their employers are behind schedule and will not be ready to comply with GDPR by 25 May. Worse still, 7% state that their organisation do not have a plan in place for GDPR.

Although not being enforced until 25 May, the transition period for organisations to become GDPR compliant began two years ago, and the DMA says there is a growing belief that the benefits of the new regulations to consumers outweigh the disadvantages to businesses, with more than half (52%) of marketers believing this to be true.

“It is encouraging to see that GDPR awareness and preparedness is at an all-time high, with marketers increasingly optimistic about the benefits of the new legislation,” said Chris Combemale, CEO of the DMA. “GDPR is a fantastic opportunity for organisations to build consumer trust and highlight to their customers the benefits of sharing their data. Organisations should use it to build a culture within their business of putting the consumer first and improving their experience.”

68% of marketers believe their employer is either on track or ahead of schedule with GDPR compliance.

In response to the findings that one in four marketers’ (27%) believe their organisations are either behind schedule or without a plan, Combemale said: “While the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has stated that they will be pragmatic before handing out penalties, these companies must show evidence that they are doing everything in their power to be ready. Otherwise they won’t just be receiving fines from the ICO; they could lose their customers’ trust and be at risk of security breaches, with the reputational damage posing a real threat to brand and share value.”

Over a quarter of marketers have received no specific training in GDPR

One of the biggest priorities for marketers and their organisations surrounding GDPR and highlighted in the report revolves around staff training – with a spike in the past six months in the percentage of marketers who feel they have received appropriate training for GDPR, up 21% from November 2017 to 54% in the latest survey.

But the DMA says it’s a concern that despite the complexities of GDPR compliance and its impact on how organisations communicate with customers, more than a quarter of marketers polled (27%) have had no specific training to date. 34% felt that more training was needed and approximately 68% believed training will help their organisation comply beyond the deadline.

Find full details on the report on the DMA website, here: https://dma.org.uk/article/gdpr-and-you-chapter-five 

Sharp rise in SMS-based mobile marketing predicted for UK

Textlocal is predicting a sharp rise in mobile marketing as Britain boasts nearly 80m active mobile phones in circulation for the first time, with only 50% of businesses surveyed currently using SMS as part of their marketing strategies.

The white paper illustrates how 37.2 million consumers have opted to use SMS and mobile communications as their preferred choice for receiving notifications from businesses.

This number is predicted to rise to 48.7 million in 2020, making SMS the fastest growing marketing channel in the UK.

The growth in smartphone usage and technological advancements have radically transformed the way British consumers behave and how businesses engage with them.

Ofcom estimates that a staggering 93% of the UK’s population now own a mobile phone, with the majority keeping them to hand for more than 16 hours a day.

The growing influence of the medium is also highlighted by the fact that 98% of branded or business-related texts are opened by mobile users, with 90% read within 3 minutes of receiving them. The report goes on to highlight that 23.5m people will respond to a business text message in 2017 and that 7bn texts will be sent this year alone.

Jason Palgrave-Jones, Managing Director of Textlocal, said: “Britain is fast becoming a ‘mobile first’ society as mobile phones are often the first and last thing people engage with each day. By their very nature, mobile phones are to hand and provide an unrivalled platform for brands to communicate directly with their audiences. These are exciting times for those involved in the mobile industry as the benefits to businesses and consumers are realised.”

SMS communication is already a leading tool for businesses looking to engage directly with customers, whether it’s to share delivery updates, appointment confirmations or marketing promotions. These messages and other applications are expected to grow rapidly in the coming months.

Rachel Aldighieri, Managing Director of the Direct Marketing Association, added: “It’s clear that mobile marketing and SMS is set to rise as UK consumers remain intrinsically linked with their phones. The medium is already widely used for sending marketing messages, however as technologies grow we expect to see an exponential rise in its use amongst businesses and consumers.”

To help manage the growth in mobile and SMS marketing, new General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) are set to come into force in May 2018. This will ensure businesses looking to engage in SMS marketing are compliant and have appropriate platforms and permissions in place when doing so.

A full version of the report can be found by contacting Scarlett@thesourcepartnership.com.