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Mobile ad spend growth set to slow to 12% CAGR

The rapid growth in mobile advertising expenditure is set to slow significantly over the next five-years, according to Strategy Analytics.

After growing over six-fold between 2013 and 2018, growth in mobile advertising revenue will fall to a 12% CAGR and the market value will reach $222 billion in 2023.

In short, while the mobile share of digital advertising will grow rapidly in less developed advertising markets, in advanced markets the share over mobile is reaching a plateau.

Strategy Analytics expects mobile advertising to continue to suffer from headwinds including increased cautiousness following Facebooks Cambridge Analytica scandal and the implementation of GDPR.

Other key findings include:-

  • Mobile advertising will rise from to 67% in 2023. In markets where multi-device use is high, like the U.S., mobile advertising will account for just 58% of all digital in 2023, while in mobile-centric markets like India it will reach 71%.
  • Asia-Pacific is leading the mobile transition, representing around 44% of global mobile ad spend across the period. At a country-level and in terms of absolute ad spend, the U.S., and mobile-first markets China and Japan will remain leaders although their positions will erode.
  • Search will remain the dominant mobile advertising format with 47% of ad spend across the period while mobile video ad spend will be the fastest growing (+16.5% CAGR over 2018-2023) driven by the adoption of 6-second mid-rolls, and vertical ad formats by industry leaders Snapchat, Facebook and more recently YouTube.

Brice Longnos, Analyst Wireless Media at Strategy Analytics, said: “Growth of mobile advertising in developed markets, where the largest brands and advertisers can be found, is slowing down as mobile competes with other screens for eyeballs, such as connected televisions. Meanwhile, in emerging mobile-first markets, mobile phones may be the primary screen for content consumption but ad budgets are lower. Therefore, the contribution to global mobile ad spend from those markets will be marginal.

“Furthermore, the progression of programmatic in display and video advertising will make ad spend more cost-efficient, increasing impressions and engagement per dollar spent. These three factors explain why we see mobile advertising expenditures slowing from 2018 onwards.”

Nitesh Patel, Director Wireless Media, added: “With mobile accounting a dominant share of revenues for leading social networks Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter in Europe, the restrictions imposed on customer data collection will be particularly felt as advertisers and publishers figure out the best approach for delivering targeted advertising while complying with regulation. In the long run, we expect advertisers to benefit as consumers giving consent will be more receptive and engaged with ad experiences.”

Vodafone, HSBC and Shell top UK valuable brand rankings

Consumers place more value on innovation as food and drink is named the most innovative sector in the BrandZ Top 75 Most Valuable UK Brands ranking.

The rankings, compiled by  WPP and Kantar Millward Brown show newer brands Just Eat, Innocent, Deliveroo and Brewdog entering 2018 UK list, which has been extended to include 75 brands.

Vodafone remains at no.1 with an increase in value of 6% to reach $28.9 billion, followed by HSBC (+7%, $23.6 billion) and Shell (+10%, $20.3 billion).

The BrandZ UK Top 75 is worth $271 billion (around £205 billion) – equivalent to just over 10% of the UK’s GDP. The 50 most valuable brands on the list have gained 5% in total value in the last year, compared with the 2017 BrandZ UK Top 50. The top innovators increased brand value by 25% more than their rivals.

This growth has been driven by the Top 10 risers, which have grown at nearly four times the rate of the rest of the brands. The fastest riser is Prudential, which increased its brand value 40% in the last year, followed by Dyson (31%), Asos (31%), and Dulux (18%). The BrandZ research shows that consumers perceive these fast-rising brands as particularly innovative and good at communicating, and they also have much stronger brand equity than the average across the ranking.

The brands that have entered the UK ranking for the first time, which are worth on average $1.1 billion, include Just Eat (no.30), bet365 (no.44), Compare the Market (no.46) and Ocado (no.49). Consumers view them as highly differentiated, recognising them for ‘shaking things up’ and providing a great experience.

However, the older established names that remain at the top, such as Dove (no.10) and Shell (no.3), are worth $4.9 billion on average. These brands are considered less different, but more meaningful and top of mind.

Higher perceptions of innovation are proven to stimulate value growth: the brands in the BrandZ UK ranking that consumers perceive as the most innovative rose +18% in value in the last year, while the least innovative declined -7%.

David Roth, at WPP, said: “The nation’s most valuable 75 brands have all risen to the top in a highly competitive, crowded and uncertain environment. Consumers value innovation, and it is key to helping UK companies’ future-proof their brands, deliver sustainable growth and increase in value; ever more vital in a post-Brexit world.”

The 2018 BrandZ Top 10 Most Valuable UK Brands

2018 Rank Brand Category Brand Value (US$bn) Percentage BV Change 2017 Rank
1 Vodafone Telecom providers $28.9 +6% 1
2 HSBC Banks $23.6 +7% 2
3 Shell Oil & gas $20.3 +10% 3
4 BT Telecom providers $13.6 -4% 4
5 Sky Telecom providers $12.0 +11% 6
6 BP Oil & gas $11.8 +4% 5
7 Tesco Retail $9.1 +2% 7
8 Lipton Soft drinks $8.7 +6% 8
9 Barclays Banks $6.3 -7% 9
10 Dove Personal care $6.0 +1% 11

The BrandZ research indicates that the UK is still catching up when it comes to innovation. In 2017, consumers perceived the UK’s most valuable brands as only slightly more innovative than the average brand, putting them at risk from global competitors and new disruptors.

The innovation score across the 50 most valuable brands in the UK was 102; in 2018 this has risen to 105 (the average brand is 100). This is lower than the 50 most valuable brands in the Global Top 100 (113), the US (111), Indonesia and China (both 108), Germany (107) and India (106).

Jane Bloomfield, Head of Business Development at Kantar UK, said: “Established and new brands can learn a lot from each other. Those older brands that form the bedrock of the UK economy have great staying power, having built salience and meaning. To grow, they need to work on increasing consumer perceptions that they are different, innovative and relevant.  The disruptors entering the ranking, meanwhile, need to make their difference meaningful and salient to consumers – if they fail to do so they could have a short lifespan.”

Global marketing technology market valued at $100 billion

The global marketing technology market is worth $99.9 billion, according to a study by accountancy Moore Stephens and research outfit WARC.

The study, carried out amongst more than 800 UK, North American, Asia-Pacific and European brands and agencies, was initiated to better understand the scale of investment into the sector, and reveals not only a huge existing market, but one that continues to grow exponentially.

When asked about the outlook for the market, brands expect to increase their investment in martech for the year ahead. This is particularly true in the case of Europe (excluding UK), where nearly two thirds (63%) said they expect their budgets to increase.

In the UK and North America, brands have increased their martech budgets by 44%, it’s now worth up to $52 billion. These brands are spending nearly a quarter (23%) of their budgets on martech, up from 16% 12 months ago.

Interestingly, brands in UK and North America are also keen to spend on in-house technology.

63% of technology budgets were spent in-house – compared to 44% last year – a figure driven by a desire from brands to excel in their customer experience, coupled with an element of mistrust in agencies.

Damian Ryan, Partner at Moore Stephens, said: “Investment in martech has reached a tipping point over the last twelve months. Established marketers in disrupted industries, such as insurance and financial services, realise they need to invest if they are to future-proof themselves, and view martech as a key area of investment. Just look at Nationwide Building Society’s recent announcement of £1 billion investment in tech. Staying relevant is key but taking on the new breed of competitors – such as Revolut – is creating a big rethink.

“All the while, agencies are struggling to stay relevant. Clearly marketers are seeking to build in-house strength and are set to spend more on martech to remain competitive. Our research finds that this budget is coming from media spend and will have a resounding impact on the value of media-centric agencies.”

Looking at the global market, those who said their budget will increase expect to see an average increase of 13%. Even more indicative of a fast-growing market is the fact that around one-in-five (18% in North America, 17% UK) expect increases of more than 25% in their martech budgets over the next year.

The research also looked at the specific technologies behind the market. On a global scale, perhaps unsurprisingly, email remains the most likely avenue for martech, used by 79% of marketers. This is closely followed by social media, with 77% currently using the technology with a further 18% expecting to use in the next 12 months.

The most planned for tactic in the year ahead, interestingly, is SEO – an established marketing discipline, but one which continues to change as algorithms develop. The biggest rise, year-on-year for the UK & North American market, was the use of martech for analytics, measurement and insights, selected by 75% – a 19% rise on a year ago.

The study showed that the most established tech currently in use is that of ‘internet of things’ (IoT) and connected devices. Second is voice which has seen rapid development over the past year, influencing the way searches are made online and driving progress in areas such as voice optimisation. A new wave of martech tools will likely emerge, and when the results are broken down by region, the UK is likely to be the most progressive in terms of voice search, with 36% stating they currently use a tool in this area, and a further 11% planning to do so in the next few months.

Amy Rodgers, Research Editor at WARC, said: “There has been no discernible sign that the rate of growth within the martech space is slackening. With data volumes continuously increasing, this research shows that data, analytics and automation are key focuses for martech investment globally as marketers look for help with metrics and measurement.

“Understanding of the technology available continues to be an issue for brands, however, and with many planning to move tech in-house over the next year, agencies will have to adapt to a changing, advisory role in the martech strategies of their clients.”

Click here to download a copy of the Martech: 2019 And Beyond report.

Complaints to the ICO ‘have doubled’ since GDPR came into force

Complaints to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) about potential data breaches have more than doubled since the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into effect, according to law firm EMW.

There were 6,281 complaints between May 25 2018, when GDPR came into force, and 3 July 2018, a 160% rise from just 2,417 complaints over the same period in 2017.

EMW says that businesses should be concerned about the significant increase in complaints and the size of potential fines that can be levied under the new GDPR.

Under the new regulations the cap on each fine will be raised to £16.5 million (or 4% of worldwide turnover of the entity being fined) – 33 times more than the current maximum £500,000 fine.

Increasing numbers of individuals are making complaints over potential data breaches, including some more disgruntled consumers making several, repeated complaints. Greater media publicity and Government advertising means there is a heightened awareness of individuals’ new data rights under GDPR. There is now a greater public focus on the accountability of businesses of all sizes in handling personal data.

EMW says individuals are most likely to make complaints when their sensitive personal and financial data is at risk. The financial services sector received over 10% of all complaints (660), with businesses in the education and health sectors receiving a combined 1,112 complaints.

James Geary, EMW Principal for Commercial Contracts, said: “A huge increase in complaints is very worrying for many businesses, considering the scale of the fines that can now be imposed. There are some disgruntled consumers prepared to use the full extent of GDPR that will create a significant workload for businesses.”

“We have seen many businesses are currently struggling to manage the burden created by the GDPR, whether or not an incident even needs to be reported. The reality of implementation may have taken many businesses by surprise. For example, emails represent one of the biggest challenges for GDPR compliance as failing to respond promptly to subject access requests or right to be forgotten requests could result in a fine. The more data a business has, the harder it is to respond quickly and in the correct compliant manner.”

Revealed: What school leavers want from a marketing career

A-Level results are in – and research from CIM has found that the next generation of marketers prioritise job security over working for a cutting-edge brand, and retain a gloomy outlook about today’s job market

The survey of 500 young people aged 17-19, who have left school or college in the past six months, found that four in 10 (41%) are interested in a career in marketing.

Around a quarter (28%) felt the best way to embark on that career was by going to university, a fifth (21%) said a trainee marketing job, and 14% thought the best route was through a marketing qualification.

The research also found that young women are more likely (45%) to want to work in marketing than men (34%). Of those going to university, 38% said they would consider a job in marketing, compared to 44% of those not going to university.

The findings also suggest that the next generation of young people may have a different outlook to millennials who, according to previous research, put a job with meaning above one with high pay.

Rather than cutting-edge start-ups, or businesses focusing on delivering social good, respondents reported that their preferred employers are likely to be large, successful companies – job security and good pay are their top priorities.

The survey of future marketers found:

  • Established firms vs innovative start-ups: 64% would choose to work in a multinational (36%) or established British firm (28%). Only a small proportion would prefer to work in an innovative start-up (11%), a small business (12%), or a charity or social enterprise (6%).
  • High salary over social value: A high salary (44%) was viewed as more important than a career that helps people (33%).
    Successful business vs cutting edge: 60% said it was very or extremely important to work in a business that is successful, compared to 35% who said that it was important to work in a business at the ‘cutting edge’ of its industry, and the 28% who wanted to work for a prestigious brand.

Chris Daly, CEO of CIM said: “This research sends an important message to businesses and marketing departments looking to attract the next generation of talent. We shouldn’t be surprised, in the current economic climate, that young people are prioritising job security in big established firms.

“These young people have grown up during an extended economic downturn, so it may be that the stability and job security of large successful firms is what appeals to them most.”

When asked what they would be prepared to give up to secure their dream job, the benefit most respondents were prepared to sacrifice was a company car (48%). Meanwhile, only 39% said they would be prepared to work at the weekend, and only 29% would be willing to give up training.

The research also reveals that these next-gen marketers have a gloomy outlook about today’s job market.

Just half of school leavers (53%) feel optimistic about landing a job that they really want, while others believe difficulty achieving the right qualifications (34%), and difficulty developing the right skills (27%) will prevent them from finding their dream job. A third (29%) of school leavers feel pessimistic about their career prospects, with young people living in London (49%) revealed as the most pessimistic in the UK.

Students opting to go to University are more optimistic (60%) about their job options compared to those not going to University (47%). The research also shows a gender split, with women more pessimistic (32%) about their job prospects than men (21%).

“It’s worrying that so many young people feel pessimistic about the job market – and that in many cases, what they are most concerned about is having the right skills or qualifications to find a job they love,” Daly added.

“Across all professions, access to training should be a business requirement rather than a nice-to-have. Marketing is a good example of a sector that has clear training and progression opportunities, not only for those looking to enter the job market for the first time, but at every stage to help support learning and development.”

Print industry ‘yet to feel effects of Brexit’

Research from Close Brothers has revealed the supply chain concerns UK SMEs from multiple sectors have regarding Brexit, including the Print sector.

The asset finance specialist polled 900 businesses – while 56% say they have felt no impact on levels of business from the UK’s decision to leave the EU, a further 20% said it was too early to tell; only 24% had felt any kind of effect.

In the Print sector, Close Brothers says the results closely reflected those of the UK as a whole, which means it’s clear that the majority of Print businesses are yet to feel any real and tangible effect from Brexit.

In terms of spending decisions, more than three quarters (76%) of businesses have not delayed spending or investment decisions because of the EU Referendum.

Roger Aust, Managing Director of Close Brothers Asset Finance Print division, said: “Once again, Print businesses reflected exactly the national picture, but what is interesting to note is that 88% of smaller firms – those with a turnover of between £250k to £500k – were the least liable to allow the EU referendum stop them from pushing their business forward and investing.

“Close Brothers has a history of lending through all economic cycles, and experience tells us that these organisations aren’t sitting on large reserves of cash, meaning that in order to maintain business levels they typically don’t have a choice but to spend and invest to ensure a sustainable flow of cash.

“Firms don’t become unviable overnight; we see it as our responsibility to do what we can to ensure our customers, who are in the main SMEs, remain in business and can build towards a profitable future.

“One alternative to consider is restructuring your business finances to make any rise in costs easier to deal with. A great way to do this is through asset finance, which is where our team of experts at Close Brothers Asset Finance can help.

“Print is a significant player in the UK economy but there are ways to mitigate the risks and still have a productive and successful business.”

37% of UK businesses ‘still not GDPR compliant’

New research shows that over a third of UK business haven’t fallen in line with GDPR, while a similar amount still send marketing emails without consent.

A survey of 1,021 UK workers carried out by MarketingSignals.com, revealed 37% confess they are still not following the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

When asked to elaborate on why the business wasn’t falling in line, 35% said they are still sending marketing emails without the expressed consent.

In addition:

  • 31% say they still have the data of those who haven’t agreed to opt in to having their data stored.
  • 27% say they haven’t secured the data in case of a ransomware attack.
  • 22% say they have a longer process for those choosing to opt out from receiving information.
  • 14% say their firm hides privacy choices from people
  • 17% say they are still unsure as to what the benefits of GDPR are

Gareth Hoyle, managing director at MarketingSignals.com said: “The research shows there are many ways that businesses are admitting to not following the newly enforced GDPR regulations. GDPR is the most fundamental change to ever happen to data privacy, so it is imperative that businesses follow this and complete the process as soon as possible.

“Businesses need to understand that acting responsibly and ethically with customer data is crucial to protect and enhance brand reputation and ensure customer trust. Not only this, but it will enhance the quality of data collected which is a good thing for UK businesses.”

These are Britain’s favourite brand logos

Britain’s favourite logo is Coca-Cola, with McDonald’s in second place and Disney’s Mickey mouse silhouette ranked third.

Coke’s iconic red and white symbol was first revealed in the late 1800s and has remained largely unchanged ever since.

It’s so popular the logo can commonly found on fashionable clothing items, homeware and other desirables – while vintage items featuring the logo can sell for thousands.

Commissioned by label makers Avery, the research of 2,000 UK adults found 62 per cent consider logos such as those belonging to Hard Rock Café and Ferrari to be ‘works of art’.

Fiona Mills, marketing director for Avery UK, said: “Last year we conducted research which highlighted the impact design and branding can have in terms of persuasiveness, consumer trust and consumer perception.

“The findings showed the results can be extremely powerful if you get the ingredients of label design spot on.

“These ingredients can include handwritten fonts, bold colours and shapes, emotion and use of heuristics – the brain’s mental decision-making shortcuts.”

Other logos in the top 10 include the emblems for Nike, Guinness and LEGO – along with those for Michelin and PG Tips.

Nostalgia appears to play a part with long established logos such as Fisher-Price, Oxo, Wall’s and Colman’s all featuring.

However relative newcomers such as Amazon, Google, Virgin and Starbucks made the top 40 too.

The research also found a product’s logo is so important it’s the first thing we notice about a product – ahead of the product’s name and even its colour.

Logos are also a key part of what makes a brand memorable – 46 per cent said they are the most enduring aspect of a brand.

A fifth are so loyal to particular brands they will specifically purchase branded products over non-branded counterparts – despite them often costing more.

But 33 per cent will only buy from brands they are familiar with – and for 53 per cent, familiarity makes them trust a brand more.

The poll also looked at the logos and brands we find most memorable from different decades – from the sixties through to the noughties.

And it emerged the eighties is the most popular era when it comes to logos, packaging and branding.

However 47 per cent think products and their packaging look better now than they ever have done before.

Branding belonging to Maxwell House, Nestle Milkybar and Kodak were found to be the most enduring of those from the sixties.

Old Spice, Fairy washing-up liquid and Wimpy were identified as the most recognisable from the seventies.

The most memorable ones from the eighties are Coca-Cola, Pepsi and Nesquik according to those polled.

And similarly the most unforgettable logos from the nineties belong to Adidas, Lynx and The Body Shop.

While Costa Coffee, Dove and Red Bull’s are the ones most associated with the noughties.

TOP 40 – MOST POPULAR LOGOS

1. Coca-Cola
2. McDonald’s
3. Mickey Mouse (Disney)
4. Cadbury
5. Apple
6. Nike
7. Guinness
8. LEGO
9. Michelin
10. PG Tips
11. Oxo
12. Mercedes-Benz
13. Google
14. Levi’s
15. Adidas
16. Pepsi
17. British Airways
18. Volkswagen
19. Shell
20. Amazon
21. Wall’s
22. Goodyear
23. Toblerone
24. Colman’s
25. Virgin
26. AA
27. BMW
28. Pringles
29. Walkers Crisps
30. Fisher-Price
31. Kodak
32. Land Rover
33. M&S
34. Ford
35. Starbucks
36. Burger King
37. Tesco
38. Hoover
39. IKEA
40. Argos

Love Island 2018 – Influencer Power List revealed

Dani & Jack were the winning couple on last night’s Love Island 2018 finale, but they weren’t the only winners to emerge from this summer’s reality show saga – plenty of their housemates now have careers as celebrity influencers waiting for them.

Reports are already suggesting that the Islanders are on course to cash in £millions thanks to public appearances and social media campaigns, and even the those who left the villa early will have the opportunity to make the most of their new celebrity status.

Indeed, according to new data from Filter Digital, ‘love rat’ Adam Collard ranks ahead of finalists Megan Barton Hanson and Wes Nelson, as well as ahead of Dr Alex George, when it comes to their fan following across social media channels.

Unsurprisingly, Love Island 2018 winners Dani Dyer and Jack Fincham top the list of Islander Influencers, but their combined followers still fall short of Love Island host Caroline Flack.

Georgia ‘Little G’ Steel comes up close behind Jack Fincham. Kendall Rae-Knight, who was the first to be dumped from the Island, surprisingly scores highly – ahead of finalists Laura Anderson, Josh Denzel and Kazimir Crossley, who all failed to make the Top 10.

Overall Love Island 2018 Influencer Power List (Top 10)

  1. Caroline Flack – 3.7m Fans
  2. Dani Dyer – 1.9m Fans
  3. Jack Fincham – 1.4m Fans
  4. Georgia Steel – 1.3m Fans
  5. Adam Collard – 0.97m Fans
  6. Alex George – 0.94m Fans
  7. Samira Mighty – 0.85m Fans
  8. Megan Barton Hanson – 0.85m Fans
  9. Wes Nelson – 0.84m Fans
  10. Kendall Rae-Knight – 0.81m Fans

To see the full Love Island 2018 Influencer Power List with all contestants, go to: https://sportstarinfluencer.com/journal/fun/love-island-2018-powerlist

Filter Digital crunched the numbers through its Sportstar Influencer platform, which usually evaluates marketing value of sports players and teams through a combination of social following, engagement metrics and team performance.

The platform uses social, engagement, media, and sentiment datapoints to rate and rank sports players against each other, comparing them at a local, national and international level.

“The Love Island contestants have been making new media careers for themselves while sunbathing and dealing with the intricacies of love and the heart,” said Oliver Morrison, CEO at Filter Digital. “By better understanding how the contestants rank against one another across social media, brands can take better decisions over where they spend their budgets.”

Google top again in YouGov’s global brand health rankings

Google tops YouGov BrandIndex’s annual global brand health rankings. In a list dominated by digital brands, the search giant stays ahead of sister company YouTube.

The ranking is based on over six million interviews over the 12 months to the end of June. It shows Samsung jumps one place from last year, climbing to third position as does messenger service WhatsApp, which rises to fourth. WhatsApp’s parent company, Facebook, falls two places to fifth.

There are three new entries in the top ten. While Amazon remains sixth on the list, IKEA enters the rankings at number seven. Colgate falls one position to eighth, while clothes brand Uniqlo makes the top ten for the first time in ninth place, while toy manufacturer Lego is another new entry at ten.

The rankings are based on YouGov BrandIndex data from across the world. BrandIndex operates in 37 countries across the globe, covering markets in North America, South America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Australasia.

For the list YouGov used data from 26 countries – data from markets that cover three sectors or fewer were not counted in the global top ten. The rankings use the Index score which assesses overall brand health. It takes into account perceptions of a brand’s quality, value, impression, satisfaction, reputation and whether consumers would recommend the brand to others.

Digital brands dominate this global ranking and with good reason. By their very nature the likes of Google, YouTube and WhatsApp are available in most places on earth to anyone with internet access. However, while many of the top five have only been around for the last decade or two, classic brands that have been around a good while longer also make the list. IKEA, Colgate, Uniqlo, and Lego, all still connect with the public and as a result have very positive brand health.

UK brand health rankings

YouGov has also released its UK brand health rankings. The list is characterised by the presence of brands that have been in the public consciousness for a long time. Traditional high-street favourites John Lewis and Marks & Spencer are first and third respectively while BBC-related brands – iPlayer and BBC One – are in second and ninth positions. Meanwhile Heinz makes an appearance in fourth place.

The rankings are drawn from over 1.46 million interviews in Britain conducted between July 2017 and June 2018. Each day consumers are asked their view on 1,384 brands in the UK, which allows YouGov to build a picture of how different brands are perceived by the general public, their own consumers, people considering using them, and their competitors’ customers.

YouGov’s analysis shows there are two new entrants in this year’s top ten – IKEA in fifth and Cathedral City in eighth. Ikea had a particular strong campaign in 2017, which featured its ‘Lion Man’ character. Sony is the most notable absentee from the rankings, having been in third place this time last year

Two brands from the global rankings are also in the UK list, with Samsung in sixth and Amazon in seventh. Pharmacy chain Boots rounds off the top ten.

Over the past year the retail sector has struggled to combat problems arising from ferocious online competition and increased business costs. However, in the face of this, the public clearly retains an affection for traditional high street brands with long and rich histories, such as John Lewis and Marks and Spencer. Similarly, while the BBC has faced challenging headlines over the past 12 month. But the public clearly still rates what the corporation offers and iPlayer and BBC One continue to be in strong brand health.

Most improved brand health

YouGov’s annual analysis also where the biggest increases in brand health have come in the past year. For several brands, escaping negative press coverage has seen an improvement in their scores, although many of them still remain in negative territory.

For example, Sports Direct, the most improved brand this year, has seen its score improve by +6.2 points, moving from -12.4 to -6.2. While in past years it has often garnered negative press, it has enjoyed a period out of the headlines and its Index score has now returned to mid-2016 levels.

Similarly, Southern Trains – for a long time blighted by strikes, cancellations, and ensuing adverse media coverage – has seen its score change from -16.1 last year to -11.3 now, an improvement of +4.8 points.

Value fashion chain Primark has made a notable leap in the past year – going from having negative brand health to positive. Its Index score improved from -0.9 to +2.7 in the last 12 months, an improvement of +3.6.

Elsewhere, Netflix continues to advance, with its score improving by +5.9 points (going from 19.5 to 25.4). Tech firm WhatsApp has seen its score increase by +3.5 – up from 18.9 to 22.4.