Digital Marketing Solutions Summit | Forum Events Digital Marketing Solutions Summit | Forum Events Digital Marketing Solutions Summit | Forum Events Digital Marketing Solutions Summit | Forum Events Digital Marketing Solutions Summit | Forum Events

Posts Tagged :

AR

The metaverse gimmick and the forgotten value of video 

The metaverse and Virtual Reality (VR) has had the weight of a number of large big technology companies behind it in the last year; spearheaded by the likes of Apple, Facebook, and Microsoft. Not only did we see its proliferation increase substantially over the pandemic, but the hype has yet to deter, particularly with speculation around products such as Apple’s RealityOS and its AR/VR Headset.

That said, the technology itself, particularly within enterprise systems, has been relatively slow in its adoption. This is because immersive content is more resource-intensive and therefore more expensive to develop, which in-turn creates quite the barrier amongst smaller companies. 

Amongst all of the upward trajectory surrounding the metaverse, it’s easy for early-stage companies to get swept up in the overwhelm and believe that they need to incorporate this into their strategies. What’s needed, however, is a return to implementable video marketing models, and a refined strategy incorporating the value of  video and immersive technology, before companies even begin to utter the word “metaverse” as a potential revenue stream. Guy Parry-Williams, Founder of Imedia8 explores this further…

The metaverse of madness

The metaverse is by no-means a new concept. In fact, it has existed since the first iterations of the 3D internet in the latter part of the 20th Century and early 2000s. However, it has developed substantially in recent years, as charged by the entertainment industry in a bid to make gaming and consumer experiences more immersive. Sitting at the intersection between technological developments and consumer experiences however, lies the issue of hype.

Over-hyping has been a long-standing issue in the tech industry. Major players and media outlets have a combined tendency to take something and transform it into a buzzword, which is louder and more overbearing than the real innovation at the crux of immersive technology.

This has happened to VR to an extent. The global AR and VR market is expected to grow to $209.2 billion this year, but the risk here is that it will be consigned to the drawer marked “gimmick” if teams do not focus on providing the end-user with a truly new experience that is of value to them. VR for the sake of VR does the industry no favours, but when the real benefits can be identified, it will prove to be ground-breaking.

VR is a profitable, but the adage “walk before you can run” rings true

In the case of corporations and enterprise, the metaverse and VR is significantly more challenging to implement, because you’re working less on the basis of entertainment and more in the bustle of protocols and efficiency.

Being able to operate and monetise VR is also incredibly tricky at a lower level because the software solutions which allow VR content to play are fairly limited compared to standard video. Additionally, the option to play 360 VR content outside of using YouTube is restricted, so it’s near-impossible for startups or SMEs to supercharge an in-house VR or metaverse strategy.

That said, it’s not impossible to create an impactful, well-rounded video and VR strategy that gives startups and enterprises the competitive advantage. The metaverse and VR can work within business’ processes, but not without understanding how to get there first. If companies opt to join the metaverse minefield before focussing on a holistic approach when it comes to the possibilities of video, they may be at a disadvantage when it comes to unlocking the future of VR’s potential.

Recognising the value of video

Video marketing was experiencing an upward trajectory before the pandemic, but its inception was certainly a catalyst in many businesses recognising its value. For instance, many companies had to pivot during this time, from somewhat traditional marketing methods to ones which adopted a video-focussed, digital-first approach.

For some, this also included adopting a variety of innovative video strategies that incorporated VR and broadcasting so that their services could still be rolled out during a time where audiences all moved online. The result was ultimately their survival – and, beyond this, they’ve been able to move past this to now grow, adapt and ultimately keep ahead of the competition. However, whilst video marketing is becoming increasingly prolific, this poses more challenges: with many businesses adopting such a strategy, cutting through the noise becomes difficult. So, being able to exhibit a video marketing procedure, but doing so in such a way that aligns with a business’ core values and highlights its USPs, is fundamental.

Ultimately, video content is a complex beast: but when it’s done right, it not only supercharges corporate marketing strategies, but it’s also impactful in terms of revenue, too. Then, once this has been mastered and profitable, companies can look at what the metaverse means to them.

Chris Hassell &Brynley Gibson

Ralph & Kuju partner to offer VR & AR experiences to brands

Brand experience agency Ralph Creative and Kuju, a full service Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) content specialist, have teamed up to offer a one-stop-shop for creating groundbreaking VR and AR experiences across any platform.

The announcement follows their earlier co-production of a music remix experience for Grammy Award winning duo The Chainsmokers and Sony Music. The experience, for the single Paris, was unveiled at SXSW in Austin to great applause.

“We are thrilled to be announcing this partnership today,” said Kuju’s Head of Studios Brynley Gibson. “When Ralph first approached us about a collaboration on The Chainsmokers’ VR experience it seemed a great fit: our interactive entertainment background in music and VR, alongside their impressive expertise in brands. We found in Ralph kindred spirits with a passion for creating cool innovative projects and we’re looking forward to showing the world what we will come up with next.”

Chris Hassell, Founder of Ralph added: “Working with Kuju is hugely exciting. We knew we wanted to find a partner that had true game development experience but never thought we’d find someone with such a pedigree, with many years of VR experience across many platforms. Based on the success and positive feedback of Paris.VR on the PlayStation Store, we are looking forward to having a lot of fun and doing more groundbreaking work with them in the future for new and existing clients.”

PlayStation-VR

OPINION: Augmented reality is going mainstream by stealth

We may have talked excitedly about Virtual Reality (VR) for the past five years, but it still feels like an emerging  technology.  I read the other day that 63% of Americans are not aware of VR or haven’t got a clear idea what it is, which means there is still a massive wow! factor opportunity.

We have tested VR a lot and have run a couple of campaigns for mobile operator DNA including a pop-up VR downhill ski experience that put the public in the boots of Olympic skiers via two 360-degree giant slalom and ski cross videos.  We used VR because it was cool and new – it hadn’t been attempted before in Finland.

VR is still quite stunt driven because there are limitations, especially with the equipment – good quality sets are still not mainstream.  But in the future it’s going to be huge.  The level of immersion is mindblowing and I can see some custom gaming uses emerging, but by summer 2018 VR will maximise its potential.

VR gives a sense of scale and distance, with its potential uses widespread. For example, I know that VR is used as an effective solution by organisations selling large-scale equipment.  It’s a lot easier to transport a VR setup to demo than it is to transport a military tank.

Because VR gives a really good perspective of being in a particular space, it is also being used to great effect alongside personalisation.  IKEA has used VR to allow shoppers to customise rooms and personally, I think it would be great see a car manufacturer like MINI use VR to produce one-off cars.

I’d love to do a VR walk-round of a MINI, sit inside and adjust it, add my own wishlist and see it brought to life.  It’s great for education too, in fact every time you have to show something new you should use VR.

Having said that, I am going to predict that Augmented Reality (AR) is going to be bigger than VR because of its widespread use on mobile platforms.

Interestingly, most people don’t think they have used AR until you ask them if they use Snapchat filters or play Pokemon Go.  It’s a fantastic sign of impending success when when people use something without knowing it. It’s nearly mainstream.

My ‘watch this space’ tip is to keep a close eye on Mixed Reality. Microsoft Hololens is definitely top of the list as the opportunities are amazing.

Ossi Honkanen is Senior Creative, Manager of Innovation, gadget hoarder and gaming enthusiast at hasan & partners, marketing communications agency with 111 people from 10 different countries, based in Helsinki and Stockholm.